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History

ReLearning Curve (formerly Design and Development Resources for Education and the Arts) has been providing schools and non-profit organizations with capacity-building support since 1990. Founded by Paul Nash, the organization primarily provided support to schools through grant writing and evaluation in order to develop and expand their arts education programming.

After the passing of its founder, Executive Director, Jody Imbimbo assumed leadership in 2006 and has broadened the scope and impact of the work. The organization has emerged with an agenda to support all types of learning institutions that seek to inspire creativity, innovation, and positive social change. It currently offers an array of services that encompass organizational capacity-building to policy research.

In 2010, the organization changed its name to reflect the evolution of its work. The new name, ReLearning Curve, is a play on the words “research for learning.” It embraces the perspective that individual and organizational learning is an iterative and ongoing process. By recognizing the value of our collective knowledge and experience, while unleashing our creativity we can rethink learning and reach our fullest potential.

About Founder Paul Nash (1948-2005)

ReLearning Curve was originally founded by Paul Nash, a passionate educator and cutting-edge musician. Paul was known for his popular compositions in experimental jazz, his unyielding drive to make music accessible to all communities, and his vision to ensure children throughout NYC have an opportunity to engage in creative outlets. He believed that knowledge, social justice, and creativity go hand in hand. He helped high-need schools to develop cutting-edge programs, such as jazz/hip hop composition courses and pairing math and music teachers to underscore their commonalities. He developed program evaluations for all kinds of schools that sought to support educational achievement through more access to the Arts. Paul also created a sister-organization, The Manhattan New Music Project, to bring innovative music programming and arts education to youth and adult audiences throughout New York City.

When Paul lost his battle with brain cancer in 2005, he asked that the organization continue its important work so that more children would have access to an “EXCELLENT!” education and the multi-faceted benefits of programs supporting music, art, and creativity.  While Paul’s passing was mourned by many in this world, his legacy lives on through the music he created, the people who loved him, and the work of ReLearning Curve.